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GPbikes telemetry and RVF instruments

Started by h106frp, December 26, 2014, 10:44:56 am

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h106frp

December 26, 2014, 10:44:56 am Last Edit: December 27, 2014, 08:50:12 am by h106frp

This is GPBikes telemetry streaming to a USB microcontroller and driving a genuine honda tacho and temp gauge all USB bus powered, also added gear position indication, shift, limiter and engine management indicators.

The needle gauge is just testing the steering torque output analogue conversion circuit  ;)

Trying the youtube thing for first time :-\
https://www.youtube.com/v/fJhcySBcHCk

doubledragoncc

Great work h. I will PM you later about this setup.

DD
GPBOC Live Streams: https://www.youtube.com/c/IASystemsComputerControls<br /><br /><br /><br />i5 7600 5.0GHz z270 ASUS Maximus Code Mobo 16GB 3866MHz DDR4 RAM ASUS Strix GTX1060 OC 6GB DDR5 Kraken X62 AIO Cooler
https://paypal.me/IASystems

HornetMaX

Good stuff !

Is it just an impression or the RPM gauge is a bit "slow" ? How does it reacts when you rev-up in neutral ?

For the videos, the simplest thing is to upload them on youtube.

MaX.

h106frp

No it follows the game rev counter on the 250, guess this is the revviest engine, in video I made a cack of pulling away. On test mode gauge swings full scale almost instantaneously if required. Microprocessor is 48mhz, faster than my first PC ! And USB is full speed usb2

doubledragoncc

Yep the old PC was a slowpoke, My first was a 286 at 40hz and 4MB RAM 1MB Graphic memory and 20MB HD all for 2500 DM in Stuttgart

I dont miss them days. Love what your doing "h" I am really interested in this.

DD
GPBOC Live Streams: https://www.youtube.com/c/IASystemsComputerControls<br /><br /><br /><br />i5 7600 5.0GHz z270 ASUS Maximus Code Mobo 16GB 3866MHz DDR4 RAM ASUS Strix GTX1060 OC 6GB DDR5 Kraken X62 AIO Cooler
https://paypal.me/IASystems

h106frp

Many thanks for the encouragement and comments, had a chance to look at the responsiveness of the rev counter in a bit more detail and it tracks the game perfectly in normal riding even when spinning the back wheel up on the grass. Clutch in and rev is a bit weird, the game bike revs to the limiter as fast as i press the keyboard button down, faster even than the needle can redraw properly, it even seems to rev faster than the rider animation opens the throttle. This might be a function of using keyboard control, not sure i could open a twist grip that fast in real life, but the engine is unloaded so i suppose this might be realistic.

Played with the dll sample rate but really does not seem to make any obvious difference, the mechanical rev counter is only just missing the peak rev even under this extreme situation and i am sure i am not missing data as the shift/over-rev LED light timing is spot on so sampling and data transfer is more than fast enough.

It may well (probably) be my old analogue tacho, its from a 90's RVF400, quite a revvy bike for its day (love NC30/35 smoothest revving engine i have encountered even at silly rpm), but not a 2 stroke racer by any measure. I do not have a modern race (or road bike) dash to try but this might move the needle quicker, i expect they use a stepper or servo to drive the needle these days rather than moving coil or even LED/LCD, i really wanted RC30 type feel to the finished set up so i went for old analogue.
Could build an led bar type counter i suppose, this should be ultra fast but not a very period feel.

Just a fun project, no problems if anyone wants to build on what i have started, all coding is VC++ for the PC end and C++ for the microcontroller/dll. Microcontroller board is a cheap pre-made item with USB connectors and break out to std stripboard pitch for the pins so no fiddly surface mount soldering there.

The electronics bits external to the microcontroller are very simple and use through hole parts for simple soldered construction once i move from plug board, even the gear position took longer to make a convincing surround than the circuit board :)